Roz Savage Project

S02E05, The Roz Savage Project

Episode Summary

Roz talks with Steve Cole, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences in the UCLA School of Medicine, about his fascinating work on the links between feelings of isolation, finding a sense of purpose, and our health. The way we feel about our lives - whether we feel engaged and purposeful, or isolated and lonely, has a very real impact right down at the epigenetic level of our cells. When it comes to our health, we really are creating our own physical reality. If you’re interested to find out more about Steve’s work, he has published an enormous number of papers, but you might prefer to start with less technical articles from the mainstream media listed below.

Episode Notes

http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/a-better-kind-of-happiness
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/23/what-our-genes-reveal-about-true-happiness/?_r=0
http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113176/science-loneliness-how-isolation-can-kill-you
http://www.economist.com/node/18226813
http://www.psmag.com/health/the-social-life-of-genes-64616/
http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/meaning-is-healthier-than-happiness/278250/
http://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/1/30/14219498/loneliness-hurts
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4176762/Why-loneliness-bad-you.html
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/why-is-loneliness-so-toxic/article37734381/  
https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2018/loneliness-risk-death.html
https://medium.com/s/2069/scientists-are-working-on-a-pill-for-loneliness-79ee7e80373c
https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/4/29/18511580/loneliness-co-living-coworking-friend-app-tribe-wework
https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/the-longevity-files-a-strong-grip-pushups-what-actually-can-help-you-live-to-a-ripe-old-age/2019/09/27/e2cffb5c-da34-11e9-ac63-3016711543fe_story.html
https://www.aarp.org/home-family/friends-family/info-2019/medical-cure-for-loneliness.html
https://www.prb.org/social-genomics/